Waste a Growing Threat to National Security, According to Nate Morris

[LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, March 22, 2022] A growing threat to America’s national security is the improper disposal of electronic waste, said Rubicon Chairman & CEO Nate Morris in remarks this week to Princeton University's Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment. 

Morris, who is involved with a variety of national security public policy groups, cited a number of examples, examining the root causes of the global waste crisis and how categories such as e-waste and space waste contribute to complications surrounding United States national security.

“I believe e-waste is going to be one of the biggest categories that we have to solve,” said Mr. Morris. “The defense community and intelligence community are more aware than ever that their devices hold sensitive clues as to what the future holds in regard to our safety.”

Mr. Morris also examined the role of e-waste in human trafficking and organized crime. 

“One of the greatest human trafficking challenges we see is associated with waste,” Mr. Morris said. “There are networks of groups that traffic individuals around the world to use as waste pickers to remove information from landfills. People who would do us harm are using child labor and trafficking to achieve this means.”

Mr. Morris also discussed Rubicon Technologies, the company he founded to reinvent the waste and recycling industry. Rubicon was founded in 2008 with “$10,000 on a credit card” and now has operations in 20 countries.

“We like to believe that technology should stand for something that solves a problem for everyday Americans,” Mr. Morris said, referring to Rubicon’s mission to “end waste.” “We believe that technology can help us spur R&D and level the playing field for small business owners, bringing in minority-owned and women-owned businesses that prior to Rubicon did not have space to grow.”

About Nate Morris

Nate Morris is the Chairman & CEO of Rubicon, a technology driven software company focused on waste and recycling. Morris is a ninth-generation Kentuckian born in Lexington and raised by a single mother. He remains close with his grandfather, a long-time union leader at the local Ford automobile plant. Morris attended Kentucky public schools. He was the first Kentuckian to be named to Fortune Magazine's 40 Under 40 list and to be recognized as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. He is also the youngest inductee ever to the Kentucky Entrepreneur Hall of Fame. Morris is a Senior Advisor to the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security, a member of Business Executives for National Security (BENS), a member of Concordia's Leadership Council and the Trilateral Commission.

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